DavidMcClelland (image via en.wikipedia.org)

David C. McClelland – The Achieving Society

“This book grew out of an attempt by a psychologist, trained in behavioral science methods, to isolate certain psychological factors and to demonstrate rigorously by quantitative methods that these factors are generally important in economic development. The scope of such an enterprise turned out to be truly alarming for one whose background in the social sciences was slight to begin with.

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edward cheung social cycles

Edward Cheung | Baby Boomers, Generation X and Social Cycles

Change happens around us everyday, but understanding change has always been difficult. Why did a generation become infatuated with rock ‘n’ roll and the civil rights movement? Why did our focus change to an obsession with the stock market and in investing in ever larger homes? What is the future of pensions and healthcare when Baby Boomers retire? The answers to these and many other questions can be found in our understanding of our past.

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max weber The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism

Max Weber – The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism

“German philosophy, political theory and economics in the nineteenth century were very different from their counterparts in Britain. The dominant position of utilitarianism and classical political economy in the latter country was not reproduced in Germany, where these were held at arm’s length by the influence of Idealism and, in the closing decades of the nineteenth century, by the growing impact of Marxism. In Britain, J. S. Mill’s System of Logic (1843) unified the natural and social sciences in a framework that fitted comfortably within existing traditions in that country. Mill was Comte’s most distinguished British disciple, if sharply critical of some of his excesses. 

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Screen Shot 2014-08-27 at 08.58.16

An Ngram of Efficiency

When confronted with a big, abstract topic I always feel at ease after running it through Google Ngram Viewer. Not necessarily because I´m hoping for a sudden epiphany – though it happened every now and then – but more out of comfort the continuous line offers a brain. A brain that keeps chewing over possible connections that big, abstract topics usually lack. In the case of an ngram of efficiency it worked out pretty well.

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